Cake Pops!

Life has been a little bit of a whirlwind and sort of tipped on its side lately.  Trying to find a good landing place, I figured baking would most likely drop me exactly where I needed.  I’ve been wanting to try some new cake pops for awhile, so I decided to create some pretty yellow ones to remind me of what the end of April is supposed to be like…sunny and springy.

Unlike the snow we woke up to last week.

No really, I’m not bitter at all.  This is Central Oregon, right?  It’s like this every year, right? The great summer makes up for the disgustingly long winter, right?

*Double sigh*

I’ve essentially made these before, but without the sticks that turn them into “pops.”  I call them cake bon-bons, and they look like this…

They are easy to make, pretty, and the perfect amount of cake!

But since cake pops are all the rage I decided to put some sticks in them and see how it went.

Don’t let this picture deceive you…I’m fairly certain these are the only three that turned out.  I really hate working with Wilton Candy Melts.  I’m desperate to know if there is any easier way to work with the round colored discs that continually make me want to pull my hair out.  Does anybody know the secret to these things?  They only stay melted for a couple of minutes and then they start to harden to the point that they don’t want to dip cleanly.  And the white drizzle on top…that was a whole other episode of angry.  Either way, these few were cute and ridiculously delicious.  My love/hate relationship with the candy melts won’t keep me from continuing to make them, but it will most likely make me use some language I won’t be proud of.

Try them out and let me know how they worked for you!  Maybe you’ll be blessed with the gift of making candy melts stay melted.

Cake Bon-Bons or Cake Pops!

1 prepared 9 x 13 cake (I use a box mix because it hold together easier, and or the ones pictured above I used a gluten-free mix so I could enjoy them too!

12 oz. ready-made frosting

20 oz. candy melts

  • Bake cake according to instructions.  Once the cake has completely cooled, use your hands to crumble it into a very large mixing bowl.  If you want the final result to be prettier, skim off the brown from the top and sides of the cake before crumbling it.
  • Stir in enough frosting to make the cake crumbs stick to each other and be able to hold a shape, but not so much that they are gooey and overly sticky.  About 3/4 of a 12 oz. tub should do the trick.
  • Line a cookie sheet with waxed paper.  Using a cookie scoop or your hands, form the cake mixture into balls.
  • Put the cake balls into the freezer for about 10 minutes.  This will help them stick together better when you are dipping them.
  • Melt the candy melts according to package directions.  Pour the melted candy into a deep bowl.  It needs to be deep enough to cover the entire cake ball.
  • Take the cake balls out of the freezer.  Gently roll them with your hands to get rid of loose crumbs.  Using two spoons, dunk each ball into the melted candy.  Cover the entire ball in one continuous motion.  Place back onto the wax paper to dry.  If desired, you can decorate with another color of melted candy melts on top.
  • Place a candy stick (available at most craft stores) into the top of your cake bon-bon.
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5 thoughts on “Cake Pops!

  1. A'Leah says:

    I can’t wait to make these. Do you melt them in a double broiler? Mine seem to be ok that way. However I don’t use theme that often. You’re amazing.

  2. Chrissie Mee says:

    double boiler is definitely the way to go. Thanks for sharing frustrations and all.

    We’d take snow down here…anything other than wind and fires. Prayers for a beautiful late spring and summer for the whole country!

  3. Cherie says:

    Annie,
    These sound delicious!

    I’ve used a fondue pot and a double boiler for candy-coating, both work well, you just have to be careful with the fondue pot so it doesn’t scorch. 🙂

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